Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Sports’ Category

The America’s Cup is the oldest trophy in sports, dating back to 1851.   It pits the worlds best yachting teams with state of the art catamaran boats.  This year, the America’s Cup finals are being held in my backyard, being held in the beautiful San Francisco Bay Area from September 7 to September 21.

I was fortunate enough to spend a day on the bay and experience the America’s cup as a spectator with the best seat in the house.     (more…)

Read Full Post »

Here in August 2013, it feels like there is unprecedented promotion, clamor, and attention for the English Premier League in the US.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

After one of their best seasons in recent history which culminated in a surprising NBA playoff run and Western Conference semi-final appearance, the exciting times just keep on rolling for the Golden State Warriors, the San Francisco Bay Area’s NBA team.   (more…)

Read Full Post »

Usain Bolt’s Olympic achievements feel simply inconceivable.  His dominance continued with mind blowing victories this week in the London 2012 Olympics in the 100 meter and 200 meter races.   How astonishing were his victories?  The New York Times created a visual graphic of Bolt’s 100 meter feat in this digital interactive (titled One Race, Every Medalist Ever) comparing his result with all other medalists in the 100 meter race in the history of the Olympics.   It’s a 2:45 video- absolutely worth the time to watch. (more…)

Read Full Post »

In 2004, Franklin Foer penned a book titled How Soccer Explains the World, An Unlikely Theory of Globalization.   When I earlier wrote about my favorite books of the past decade, it earned honorable mention in the globalization category, so certainly a work I hold with high regard.

Foer spent six months traveling to the world’s soccer capitals trying to assess if the growing  internationalization of the game could help explain the rapid globalization of the world’s economy and lifestyle.   (more…)

Read Full Post »

Two recent and unrelated phenomenon are Foursquare and Vuvuzelas.  Foursquare is the preeminent geo-location service, (competing sites include Gowalla, Loopt, and Yelp) where users check in to locations such as restaurants, bars, parks or almost any type of establishment, in essence announcing to their friends on social network and media sites like Facebook and Twitter where they are at the moment. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Rafael Nadal won the 2010 Wimbledon today, a month after his 2010 French Open championship.  Nadal is certainly back, regaining top form after injuries derailed much of his 2009.  He now has 8 Grand Slam championships, surpassing John McEnroe and tying him with Ivan Lendl and Jimmy Connors in career grand slams.  And all of this by age 24.

With these consecutive titles, the discussion of how far can Nadal go is reigniting—a requisite inclusion in any article chronicling his Wimbledon championship (see Bruce Jenkins article, and Greg Garber’s article here).   With Nadal’s 8th Grand Slam championship, he’s now halfway to Federer’s total of 16.  It’s time to take a renewed look at his current and possible future performance compared to historical legends and update my posting last year about Nadal’s candidacy for GOAT. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The World Cup has completed its group play stage and has reached the exciting knockout quarterfinals.  The remaining teams are now battling for the title of World’s best, with only the razor’s edge of margin separating the very top teams.  The drama, excitement and pressure are all building and drawing in more and more fans around the world.

All of this excitement has me lamenting that I have not seen a World Cup event in person.  I’ve stated that my goal in 2014 will be to attend the World Cup in Brazil.   But as I think about attending the World Cup, I also ask myself which event would be better to attend:  the World Cup or the Olympics.  After all,  Brazil also hosts the 2016 Olympics.    To me the answer is clear:  the World Cup, and this article from sports journalist Peter King provides the justification better than I ever could.   (more…)

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, the 2010 World Cup in South Africa began.

2010-world-cup-logo

As I write this, I’m eagerly awaiting the US-England match later this morning.  Some are calling the match the most eagerly awaited match in the history of US soccer.     For me, the World Cup spectacle held every 4 years is one of the best of all sporting events; it combines fantastic skill, unbelievable passion and energy from the fans of the teams, globalization and a common them that people around the world can rally around, tradition and history that fans cling to, and opportunity for late game drama.   The 2002 run for the US team was one of my favorite sporting moments of the 2000’s, as I documented here.

As I think back to the last World Cup in 2006 and the current one in 2010, I also think about two Internet and social media companies—Yahoo! and Twitter. (more…)

Read Full Post »

The NCAA tournament continues this weekend with the Final Four, consisting of Butler, Michigan State, West Virginia, and Duke.   Butler is one of the real stories of this tournament- playing in the Final Four only six miles from their campus in Indianapolis.  The other angle to the Butler story is the presence of the so called Mid-Major in the Final Four.  Every year during the tournament, the talking heads discuss the Cinderella stories of teams like Northern Iowa, St. Mary’s and Cornell and then get into debates whether teams like Xavier, Butler, and Gonzaga are mid-majors or not. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: